Marshmallows

So, we’ve all heard of The Marshmallow Test, right? This is where children are tested on their ability to resist one marshmallow on the promise of getting two marshmallows later (a level of self-control that even as an adult I find a challenge!).

But what about the Other Marshmallow Test?

This is a game I conceived to illustrate the benefits of limiting work in progress – given as a talk at Agile in the City.

Cracking the WIP – The Other Marshmallow Test

The initial premise is about efficiency – can we complete our work faster (or consume our marshmallows more quickly) when doing it one piece at a time, or by multi-tasking? In itself it’s an interesting question, and in the game the answer often depends on the individuals who have volunteered and how much they enjoy marshmallows. There is so much more to observe when you try this out though, such as the impact on stress levels, managing risk, delivering value etc. You can download the slides here to get the full story.

The best thing about the game is that it shows just how far the concept of limiting work in progress applies to any work environment – this is not just about software! Upon seeing the game played in a lightning talk, a member of our legal team considered whether this could help them deal with the barrage of requests they get from all directions. An invitation to visit his team swiftly followed.

Kanban in the Legal Team

We played the game, talked about flow, and then I left them with Kate Sullivan’s talk about agile adoption within the legal team at Lonely Planet. A couple of weeks later I strolled by to witness the joy of a stand-up around a kanban board.

We talked about the benefits they were experiencing, as well as some of the challenges remaining. They still have things to improve (we all should continuously improve, after all) but they were finding a lot of blockers removed simply by visualising and verbalising them together. You can read more about how they have decided to apply agile in a post written by John Halton (Assistant GC) for Practical Law.

Learning at FT

One of the things I love about working at the FT is seeing teams from across departments learn from each other. Just as our legal team have learnt about agile from technology; our product and tech teams have learned a lot about how to use KPIs from our commercial teams; our editorial teams think more about reader engagement with help from our analytics teams; and here in engineering we continually exchange new lessons with every department we work with.

Removing the Tester Safety Net

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Moving to Continuous Delivery and a Quality Focused Process

We’re all familiar with the waterfall approach of software development.  It keeps skill-sets in silos and, from a tester point of view, we were the ones squeezed for time when projects overran.

Adopting agile in the latest Membership Programme incarnation at the Financial Times many years ago started to make a change.  The concept of starting to break work into smaller pieces and working much closer to one unit as a team removed the big bang approach of these problems.  Ultimately they still existed.  Like most development teams our testers were outnumbered by developers, but ultimately had as much if not more to do.  The introduction of automated testing if anything made matters worse.  When you’re new to agile you can struggle to work out where to build automated tests into the process.  We agreed that they needed to be part of the sprint from day one, but this meant we still had split skill-sets – manual and automated testers.  Both were needed to get the work done. Continue reading “Removing the Tester Safety Net”

The Bootcamp Experience

Earlier this year, I joined FT’s membership team as a Java Developer. On a typical day, the membership team are responsible for developing and maintaining a series of microservices which provide APIs for FT to manage its subscribers through our various mobile platforms. This includes setting up new subscriptions on the FT site/mobile app, which our web application services are able to handle and ensure customers are successfully subscribed and more importantly, have access to content they are paying for. Continue reading “The Bootcamp Experience”