The Nitty Gritty

As you know last month we entered the BCS UK IT Awards under ‘Digital Project of the year’ for our successful removal of eRights for our digital subscribers and smooth implementation of microservices as an effective replacement.

The entire process took seven months. Seven months to uplift a decade old service, scrape off all the leftovers, clean the systems and put a brand new system in place, as well as ensuring the new system catered to our modern customer’s needs. Seven months sounds like a long time, but really this is only 24 weeks (approx.), 168 days, perhaps around 600-800 hours. This was certainly no mean feat..

Continue reading “The Nitty Gritty”

‘Get to know Sue, our new Head of Design’

Hi Sue, welcome to the FT! You’ve just joined as the Head of Design for Product. What’s your background?
When I was young I loved fine art, but being far too sensible at 18 I abandoned the idea of being an artist in my garret, and went on to study Typography at Reading University. It was here I developed a nerdy passion for text based graphic design that has influenced my work choices ever since. Continue reading “‘Get to know Sue, our new Head of Design’”

Origami and 177 FT sites

The FT has a lot of websites. More than just FT.com. These sites can be split into some categories:

  1. Things displaying news content to customers. FT.com, things built by the interactive graphics team, Google AMP stories, Facebook Instant Articles
  2. Things talking about the FT itself. Marketing micro-sites, FTLive events pages, things that are about the FT but not the FT
  3. Separate publications. The FT owns about 15 other publications such as www.thebanker.com, www.money-media.com, and www.ftadviser.com.
  4. Internal sites and tools. The sites people use to do their jobs, be that writing articles, managing subscriptions or monitoring uptime.

I don’t know exactly how many sites the FT currently has, I have a spreadsheet with 177 rows in it which is how many I’ve found so far*.
Continue reading “Origami and 177 FT sites”

Meetup @FT: Testing Security as Part of Continuous Delivery

At the end of May the FT was excited to host the London Continuous Delivery meetup with the topic ‘Testing Security as Part of CD (Continuous Delivery)’. The focus was on trying to build security into software from the start.

There were two excellent presentations. One from Phil Parker, a partner at Equal Experts, and another from Ian T Price who is an independent consultant. Both presentations and a link to the meetup can be found at the end of this post.

Here are some of the most interesting takeaways from the two presentations.

Continue reading “Meetup @FT: Testing Security as Part of Continuous Delivery”

Engine Room Live internal conference 2016

We did it again – and this time it was even better!

Pretty much immediately after our inaugural Engine Room Live event last year, it was decided that we needed to run another one this year. People loved it! And who were we to deny the people?

So, plans for our second one began. What was it that had made people love it so much? We needed to make sure we knew what that was, so that we could make it even better.

Throwable mics for the audience Continue reading “Engine Room Live internal conference 2016”

A faster FT.com

How slow websites damage publishers revenue

The FT is building a new version of its website.

Conventional wisdom states that web performance matters and the emphasis of new technical standards like H2 and products for publishers like AMP and Instant Article is speed, acceleration, and instantaneousness.

But why does this matter to our business?

We wanted to understand how much the speed of our website affected user engagement, specifically, the quantity of articles read, one of our key measures of success. Using that data we then wanted to quantify the impact on our revenue.

Continue reading “A faster FT.com”

Can We Test It? Yes We Can

Hopefully as developers who practice more-or-less test driven development, the excuse that “this code isn’t really testable” should always be challenged these days – indeed, one definition of “legacy code” is “code without test cases”. But what about the non-executable artefacts of a component? There’s usually more than just a binary file involved in deploying a service: for example, a service might transform documents using XSLT, invoke an internal scripting engine, or have a configuration file generated by some templating framework. Can we automate checking on these additional pieces of the jigsaw to reduce the risk of launching broken deployments?

Continue reading “Can We Test It? Yes We Can”

Salesforce, mobile & Front end stories

Salesforce has its own proprietary language called Apex. Apex provides easy to build data views and because the out of the box interface is never enough, it also has it’s own front end proprietary language, Visualforce. Apex is very much a Java-like object-oriented language in syntax and grammar, however the concept of programming is rather Database – oriented. With Apex you can access and perform all the known DML actions on your data. Visualforce is a markup language with plenty of tags that essentially are ‘translated’ as html elements when the pages you have built are rendered. Furthermore Visualforce has out of the box JavaScript components that will enhance the flow of the UI. Take the two together, Apex + Visualforce and you have got a powerful combination of customizable views and data manipulation. There’s nothing you can’t do right?

Continue reading “Salesforce, mobile & Front end stories”